Roma: a dense haven of supreme history

 

Vittorio Emanuele

It seems as if every bit of historical knowledge I've acquired since freshman year was realized the moment I arrived in Roma. All of the places we'd review during cram sessions for Gloria Hunt's history of arch exams miraculously resurfaced as if I'd actually remembered them since turning in that final exam. Simply put - Rome is important, and I could feel that power immediately.

View from Campidoglio

4 crammed days in one big city, and each day felt like a completely different metropolis. I am fortunate to experience these cities through the very curated and experienced lens of my two architecture professors here, but even 4 days was not enough (I didn't even see the Vatican). So, it looks like I'll be dragging Cam back to Rome with me for a day before we start our adventures this May.

I particularly enjoyed studying Rome as series of scales and expansions. It was surreal to end my weekend at the Roman Forum, intimately interacting with one of the most awe inspiring sites in the world. Every move is deliberate and brilliant. I'd often find myself forgetting the shear age of such a site, having to remind myself of life that it was born into. 

Honestly, I realized that I have been fully converted to the dark side that is 'architecture' when I teared up while entering the Pantheon. The weight of emotion was unexplainable. It will forever be the most experiential creation I think I'll ever encounter. And for those who have never been - those front columns are like 8 feet in diameter. It's the most ill proportioned gem in terms of direct contemporary site context, but that's what makes it absolutely incredible. 

Vittorio Emanuele

View of Vittorio Emanuele from Trajan's Market

The train ride to and from Rome and Florence was serene. Upon arriving back at Santa Maria Novella with aching backs, throbbing feet and heavy eyelids I couldn't help but feel an overwhelming sense of comfort in Florence. The city enveloped our tired souls with open arms -the purest sense of contentment.